Jilleda Jay John Remembered Tonight ARIZONA (UNSOLVED HOMICIDE)

TONIGHT THE FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF JILLEDA JAY JOHN, A YOUNG NAVAJO MOTHER  AND VICTIM OF AN UNSOLVED HOMICIDE IN CANYON DE CHELLY, NEAR CHINLE, AZ,  IN 2006,  WILL REMEMBER JILLEDA WITH A CANDLELIGHT VIGIL.
 
THE CANDLELIGHT VIGIL WILL BEGIN WITH FLOWERS PLACED AT THE REMOTE PART OF MUMMY CAVE/DEL MUERTO, WHERE JILLEDA’S REMAINS WERE FOUND ON JUNE 16, 2006.  (OFFICIAL DEATH DATE)
FROM MUMMY CAVE, THE CANDLIGHT SERVICE WILL CONTINUE TO THE FAMILY’S BURIAL PLOT.  WE ASK FOR YOUR PRAYERS TONIGHT FOR  JUSTICE  AND PEACE FOR JILLEDA, AS WELL AS HEALING FOR HER YOUNG SON, FAMILY, AND  FRIENDS. 
 
 WE REMEMBER YOU JILLEDA JAY JOHN… ALWAYS!
 
BACKGROUND ON THIS CASE: 
JILLEDA HAD GONE MISSING IN MARCH.  SOME OF HER REMAINS WERE LEFT AT THE CRIME SCENE BY THE APACHE COUNTY AND NAVAJO INVESTIGATORS WITH NO YELLOW TAPE OR CORDONED OFF AREA.  IT WAS THE FAMILY WHO FOUND MORE OF JILL’S REMAINS … INVESTIGATORS HAD LEFT BEHIND A WEALTH OF FORENSIC MATERIAL AT THE CRIME SCENE.  ALTHOUGH A HOMICIDE, THE FBI WAS NOT CONTACTED UNTIL MUCH LATER, WHICH IS A VIOLATION OF THE MAJOR CRIMES ACT.  ALSO THE FBI NEVER POSTED A REWARD FOR THE MURDER AS PROMISED TO THE FAMILY.  IT WAS ALMOST 2 1/2 YEARS LATER THAT JILL’S REMAINS WERE RETURNED TO HER FAMILY AND DEAREST JILLEDA WAS LAID TO REST.  PLEASE JOIN IN OUR PRAYERS FOR HEALING AND JUSTICE AS WELL AS PRAYERS FOR THE FAMILY.  ALSO, PLEASE CIRCULATE THIS TO OTHERS WHO MAY HELP IN THIS CASE AND/OR THOSE WHO WOULD LIKE TO KEEP THIS FAMILY IN PRAYER TONIGHT AND ALWAYS, UNTIL THIS CASE IS SOLVED.
MAY  MAY YOU REST IN PEACE, JILL… 
 
Here’s the news articles:
DEL MUERTO, Ariz., Oct. 16, 2008

Two-and-a-half years after her badly decomposed body was found on a Canyon del Muerto road, the family of
Jilleda Jay John laid her to rest last Tuesday.

It was a lovely, if late, funeral, the family agreed, on the kind of crisp fall day where you can almost hear
the piñon cones popping open on the canyon rim.

But, as John’s aunt Cynthia Hunter put it, "There was a big question mark" hanging over the service.

The big question is, who killed Jilleda?

But, after talking to the family, it’s evident there are lots of little questions floating about as well.

Why, in a case with enough evidence to fill an entire season of "CSI," are there still no suspects? Why did it
take the FBI two and a half years to positively identify the body and return the remains to the family? Why is
the family not being kept in the loop on the investigation?

And, perhaps the most hurtful: "Why is it that when a white tourist falls into the canyon, every search and
rescue group from miles around shows up to look for them, but when one of our own Native girls disappears,
the family has to organize a search themselves?"

From : http://www.navajotimes.com/news/index.php
October 16, 2008 NEWS

Jonavin John, 4, and his grandmother Lorraine Walker pose with a drawing of John’s late mother and Walker’s
daughter Jilleda John in Del Muerto, Ariz.

Family stonewalled in murder case
Still no charges in 2-year-old Del Muerto murder case; family finally allowed to bury woman

By Cindy Yurth
Tséyi’ Bureau

 (Times photo – Donovan Quintero)

DEL MUERTO, Ariz., Oct. 16, 2008

T wo-and-a-half years after her badly decomposed body was found on a Canyon del Muerto road, the family of
Jilleda Jay John laid her to rest last Tuesday.

It was a lovely, if late, funeral, the family agreed, on the kind of crisp fall day where you can almost hear
the piñon cones popping open on the canyon rim.

But, as John’s aunt Cynthia Hunter put it, "There was a big question mark" hanging over the service.

The big question is, who killed Jilleda?

…(It’s) evident there are lots of little questions floating about as well.

Why, in a case with enough evidence to fill an entire season of "CSI," are there still no suspects? Why did it
take the FBI two and a half years to positively identify the body and return the remains to the family? Why
is the family not being kept in the loop on the investigation?

And, perhaps the most hurtful: "Why is it that when a white tourist falls into the canyon, every search and
rescue group from miles around shows up to look for them, but when one of our own Native girls disappears, the
family has to organize a search themselves?"

That’s Hunter again. And, she admits, that’s not quite true – the Navajo Police did eventually do a search,
but only after the family, unable to get them to respond, called the Apache County Sheriff’s Office, which
sent deputies in immediately.

The tribe’s Criminal Investigation Administration office in Chinle, which is handling the case along with the
FBI, referred this reporter to CI headquarters in Window Rock, which referred her to Navajo Police headquarters,
which didn’t return the call.

Manuel Johnson, FBI special agent in charge of media relations for Arizona, confirmed the case is still active
and is being handled by the FBI’s Gallup office. Beyond that, he said, he doesn’t know any details and wouldn’t
be authorized to release them if he did.

This is pretty typical treatment of the press when it comes to active murder cases. But family members say
they’re being stonewalled too.

"Nobody tells us anything," said Joanne Hunter, another aunt of John’s. "We have to call and ask how it’s going,
and they say, ‘No suspects yet.’ That’s all."

John, 22, left her home on the canyon rim on March 6, 2006, and didn’t come home that night. At first, the family
wasn’t too concerned … John had a history of depression and sometimes took short trips to clear her head.

But after they didn’t hear from her for two weeks, they became concerned and reported her missing.

From the start, Joanne said, the police didn’t seem to take the report seriously.

"When they found out she had a history of this kind of thing, they said, ‘Oh, she’s just hiding from you,’" she
recalled. "But we know her pattern. She always calls after a day or two and says, ‘Oh, I’m at so-and-so’s house.’
She never stayed away more than three days."

Sightings

The family later learned that John had been spotted twice the night she left.

A bus driver had given her a ride to Chinle and dropped her off near the Chinle School District’s transportation
barn. A school district security guard at the site spoke to her briefly and noticed she seemed to be frightened
of something. He called the police, but by the time they responded, she had walked away and they didn’t locate
her.

"If they had just tried a little harder to find her, maybe they would have brought her home and we wouldn’t
be having a funeral," Cynthia said.

When the police didn’t immediately organize a search, Joanne said, the family got together some volunteers from
the community and searched the canyon rim. When the sheriff’s deputies responded, they searched the entire Twin
Trails, as John’s home is located at the trailhead.

The family continued periodic searches for the next two months. They also hung posters with John’s picture and
alerted the local media. But the missing-person posters mysteriously disappeared, sometimes within an hour of
being hung.

"We tried to get the police to have an undercover officer hang around where we had a poster and see who took it
down, but they said they didn’t have time for that," Joanne recalled.

By mid-May, police reportedly told John’s family the likelihood of her being found alive was slim. The family
called off the search.

On June 16, 2006, a National Park Service employee was doing a survey of dirt roads in the canyon. He was driving
down Hanging Ladder Road, a back entrance to Mummy Cave, when he encountered an apparently manmade roadblock:
a pile of branches in the middle of the road.

The ranger moved the branches and proceeded, only to find another pile a little farther down the road. Then
another. Intent on his task, the ranger kept removing the piles and driving on.

Behind the last pile, a grisly sight awaited him: a human body so badly decomposed he couldn’t tell if it was
male or female.

The ranger immediately notified police, but it wasn’t until two days later that John’s family learned of the
discovery – not from the police but from a Park Service volunteer who just thought they should know.

"The fact that they knew we were searching for our niece all that time and they wouldn’t even tell us when
remains were found is really distressing," Joanne said.

That would be just the beginning of the distress John’s family continues to feel to this day.

After a few days, the family ventured out to the site. "We just felt like we should see it," Joanne said.

They were surprised to find it wasn’t secured or marked off with yellow crime scene tape. But they were even
more surprised at what the police had evidently missed.

What police missed

According to Joanne, there were clear tire tracks and footprints in the dried mud that indicated a chase and
a struggle – raising the distinct possibility that this was more than the spot where someone dumped her body –
it was where she died.

Near what looked like "a big grease spot," apparently where John’s body had lain, the aunts found bones and an
amber taillight fragment with some numbers on it.

About 50 yards from the apparent murder scene, they found a pile of clothes – mostly John’s, but there was also
an extra-large T-shirt with a logo from a softball tournament in Lukachukai.

The family was thrilled with what appeared to be some very good leads. But when they presented the items to the
police, they said, they were met with a lukewarm reception.

"They said, ‘That’s a crime scene. You shouldn’t have been there,’" Joanne recalled.

Joanne said she also hasn’t been told whether the police followed up on another important lead the family gave
them: John had been scheduled to testify in a case against an alleged drug dealer on March 8 – two days after she
disappeared.

"I’m not a detective, but I watch a lot of ‘CSI,’" said Sylvia Watchman, another aunt. "They’re always able to
solve the crime with a lot less evidence than we have in this case."

As the months dragged by, the family started wondering when they would be able to bury their niece and daughter.
They understood that her body was being held as evidence, but it seemed as though ample time had transpired for
the police to get what they needed from the bones.

When Joanne inquired, "I was told they hadn’t positively identified her yet," she said. "She was being held
in the morgue as a Jane Doe."

Several DNA tests were inconclusive, and at one point, the bones were divided and some were sent to a crime
lab in Virginia. Joanne isn’t sure why.

Finally, a few weeks ago, the bones were presented to the family, positively identified as their relative.
They were buried in the family plot after the funeral.

"It’s good we were able to lay her to rest," said Jancinta Towne, another aunt. "But we’re still not at peace.
She was a good-hearted person. She didn’t deserve to die that way. She deserves justice."

Cynthia said she hopes that someone who knows something about the murder will read this story and come forward.

"We have a little boy here without a mother," she said, referring to John’s son, now 4. "Please, come and clear
your conscience. Let us put this to rest at last."

Gallupindependent.com/
April 1, 2006

cache of http://www.gallupindependent.com/2006/apr/040106missing.html
Page not available except in Cached

Family seeking Chinle woman
missing one month
By Independent Staff

GALLUP — A Chinle, Ariz., woman disappeared nearly a month ago, and worried family members are asking the public

for help in locating her.

Jilleda "Jill" John, 22, was reportedly last seen in Del Mureto, Ariz. on March 7, 2006. Family members describe
John as 5′ 5" in height and about 160 pounds. She was last seen wearing black sweat pants with a white stripe
down the side of the pant legs, a gray sweater, and white tennis shoes.

On March 21, the family filed a missing persons report with the Navajo Police Department in Chinle.

(family info removed here)

… it is unlike her to be gone for such a long time without contacting her family. John has a
2-year-old child who is being cared for by family members.

John’s mother and aunt said they are hoping for a phone call from John, assuring them she is OK.

Anyone who has information about Jilleda John’s disappearance is asked to call  (family phone removed) 
the Navajo Police Department in Chinle at (928) 674-2111

(Or Call 911 Anywhere) You can remain anonymous with a tip!) Katfirewoman Cares

Articles Reposted under Fair Use Act

 Katfirewoman Cares  

Advertisements

About katfirewoman

"A Watcher"
This entry was posted in News and politics. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s